The H3ABioNet Seminar coordinators and task force cordially invite you to join us for our seventh webinar for 2022, the July seminar titled "Role of variations in modern drug development and research – a way forward via structural bioinformatics approaches".

    Seminar Format:  A seminar talk will be provided by Prof. Özlem Tastan Bishop, a full Professor in structural bioinformatics at Rhodes University, South Africa and distinguished adjunct Professor at Saveetha University, Chennai, India. 

    This intriguing talk will be 40 to 50 minutes long followed by 10 to 15 minutes of Questions & Answer as well as Discussion.

    Seminar Date: Wednesday, 20th July 2022
    Seminar time: 8am EST/ 5am PDT / 1pm UTC / 3pm CET/ 2pm WAT /2pm LT/ 3pm CAT / 4pm EAT

    URL to join the seminar: H3ABioNet_Webinars

     

    Description:  The genome sequences of humans and pathogens, and the variations attached to these data, can offer fundamental insights into disease prevention and treatment. Decoding the effects of missense mutations on protein structure and function is crucial to the understanding of the underlying causes of inherited diseases; drug toxicity in particular populations; and mechanisms of drug resistance, among others. While an enormous amount of genome data has been generated, the transition to post genomic analysis has been slow, thus widening the gap between data generation and translational utilization. For example, the human genome consists of about 20,000 protein coding genes and over 900 million variants. Systematic knowledge of the impact of genomic alterations in human is critical for the development of effective medicines. However, it is simply not feasible to study each and every one of these variants in detail. To date the effect of variations at the protein level is poorly studied in computational drug discovery research. This is mainly due to experimental difficulties in analyzing data at the protein structural level. We previously proposed a post-hoc analysis approach of molecular dynamics simulations using dynamic residue network analysis to consider the dynamic nature of functional proteins and protein-drug complexes and to probe the impact of mutations and their allosteric effects. This talk focuses on examples including drug resistance in infectious diseases; proposing computational approaches for common ways of dealing with different health problems.

    About the Speaker:

    Özlem is full Professor in structural bioinformatics at Rhodes University, South Africa and distinguished adjunct Professor at Saveetha University, Chennai, India. She received her BSc degree in Physics from Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey. Then she moved to the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the same University for her MSc degree. She obtained her PhD from Max-Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics and Free University, Berlin, Germany in 2003. While doing her PhD, Özlem became interested in structural biology, and during her postdoctoral positions (Texas University, USA; University of Western Cape and University of Pretoria, South Africa) she gained experience in structural bioinformatics as well as structural biology. In 2009, Özlem took up an academic position at Rhodes University, South Africa. She established the Research Unit in Bioinformatics (RUBi) in 2013. She has graduated 21 PhD and over 35 MSc students since she joined Rhodes University. Recently, she received the Vice Chancellor’s Distinguished Senior Research award for 2020 and South African Society for Bioinformatics (SASBi) Silver Award, 2022. She serves on the Editorial Board for Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences and Frontiers in Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Biological Modeling and Simulation Section, and she is an Advisory Board member of F1000Research Bioinformatics Gateway.
    Özlem’s broad research interest is structural bioinformatics and its applications to drug design and development. Her recent interest is in the allosteric mechanisms of proteins and understanding the effects of nonsynonymous single nucleotide variations on protein structure and function. She has published over 85 research articles.

     


    Previous H3ABioNet webinars are available on YouTube


    The H3ABioNet Webinar coordinators and task force cordially invite you to join us for our sixth webinar for 2022, the June webinar titled "Exploration and sharing of global health data using the ClinEpiDB platform".
     
    Webinar Format: The webinar talk will be provided by Professor David Roos, who is a professor of Biology at the University of Pennsylvania (in Philadelphia PA, USA). This fascinating talk will be 40 to 50 minutes long followed by 10 to 15 minutes of Question & Answer as well as Discussion.
    Webinar Date: Wednesday, 22nd June 2022
    Webinar Time: 8am EST/ 5am PDT / 1pm UTC / 2pm CET/ 2pm WAT /2pm LT/ 3pm CAT / 4pm EAT
    URL to join the Webinar: Webinar Link
     
    Description: We live in a world increasingly dominated by data, as this audience is very well aware: from weather forecasting & geolocation mapping to web search & telecommunications; from financial services & econometric modeling to genomic datasets & electronic medical records.  The international public health sector is no exception, with increasing emphasis on large-scale epidemiological studies and data-driven decision-making … as has been very much in evidence during the Covid-19 pandemic.  The clinical epidemiology database ClinEpiDB.org, first released in 2018, seeks to leverage robust computational infrastructure and a rigorous ontological framework to facilitate the management and exploration of de-identified data from large, high-quality global health studies, enhancing ethical and effective data FAIRness (Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability & Reusability).  ClinEpiDB currently hosts data representing millions of participants from scores of observational and experimental studies in three major domains: Maternal, Newborn & Child Health; Malaria; and Neglected Tropical Diseases, providing a standardized, user-friendly platform for data exploration and visualization, enabling users to formulate their own questions, rather than being limited to pre-computed representations of the data.  This platform has proved particularly useful for exploring real world patterns associated with complex disease processes.  Providers retain control over data access, including (when appropriate) the ability to share with collaborators and the broader research community, satisfying data-sharing requirements and restrictions mandated by journals, funders, institutions, and national regulatory authorities.  In this webinar, we will use a variety of publicly-accessible studies to demonstrate how the intuitive point-and-click ClinEpiDB interface allows users to search datasets, explore associations between variables, and download data for further analysis.  We will also discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with FAIR data access.  Finally, we will summarize plans for the future, including support for new graph types, map functionality and analysis tools; implementation of user-derived variables and DIY functionality enabling users to upload and privately analyze or share their own data; development of cross-silo queries harmonizing data from related studies and interrogating across epidemiological & molecular datasets; and opportunities for the engagement of additional global partners.
     
    About the Speaker:
    David S Roos is the E Otis Kendall Professor of Biology at the University of Pennsylvania (in Philadelphia PA, USA), where he is also affiliated with graduate programs in Microbiology, Virology & Parasitology, Genomics & Computational Biology, Cell & Dev